Sport

Tomic searches net to learn how to best Brands' game play

BERNARD Tomic will turn to the internet as he plans how to beat his next opponent - qualifier Daniel Brands.

After cruising past Argentine Leonardo Mayer in straight sets on Tuesday night, Tomic will take on the German today and readily admits he knows little about the 120th ranked player in the world who upset 27th seed Martin Klizan in straight sets in round one.

"YouTube," Tomic replied when asked how he would find out about how Brands plays.

"You know, I'll just see it on the internet maybe. Obviously my dad and my team will also look at his stats and where he plays and how he's played.

"I have never played or hit with him, so I will definitely study up on how to play him."

Tomic said he did not mind playing in the heat of the day at Melbourne, despite temeperatures tipped to reach the high 30s.

"It's going to be hot - not just for me but for my opponent," he said.

"I don't mind playing in the heat in Australia, especially in Melbourne when it gets hot.

"It's not a problem. I struggled a little bit with the humidity sometimes."

Australia's only other survivor in the men's singles, James Duckworth, will back up from his marathon five-setter against countryman Ben Mitchell with a match today against Slovenian Blaz Kavcic.

Kavcic upset the 29th seed Thomaz Belluci from Brazil in three sets in round one.
 

Topics:  australian open, bernard tomic, internet, online, tennis


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