Business

Final Cut Pro evolution puts power in hands of us all

Apple's Final Cut Pro uses the familiar iMovie interface.
Apple's Final Cut Pro uses the familiar iMovie interface.

ANYONE who has edited a video knows it can be a time-consuming labour of love - and frustration.

Depending on the program you are using, creating that home movie masterpiece or small business promo can take hours to produce just minutes of viewing.

And the learning curve for some programs is ridiculous. They are packed with features but are anything but user-friendly.

What you really want is a program that can provide great features and lots of short cuts along the way that is relatively easy to use.

Apple's Final Cut Pro X certainly fits the bill here.

What was once a $2000 editing suite pitched at professionals has been redesigned from the ground up to make it far more accessible to us all.

If you have used iMovie on your iPhone, you should pick up the basics pretty quickly as it shares the same look and functionality. But Final Cut has a stack more features to justify its $299 price tag.

When it first came out it was dubbed iMovie on steroids. Upgrades since have made it even better.

Some of the coolest features of the program are:

Magnetic timeline - you can add and arrange clips wherever you want them while other clips slide out of the way.

Clip connections - your video and audio files stay together so when you edit them you don't find things out of sync.

Auditions - a great way of looking at how different shots might look in a story quickly.

Multicam - you can use vision from an iPhone, a sound recorder, your digital SLR and a professional movie camera with automatic sync and support for mixed formats. Up to 64 camera angles can be accommodated.

Clever media organisation - you can tag your video and audio with keywords and even different descriptions (close up, wide shot etc) to quickly locate what you are after.

Compound clips - you can combine related story elements into a consolidated group that you can edit as a single clip.

The real beauty of Final Cut Pro comes as you are editing. All the rendering of the video is done in the background so you don't have to continually wait for every change to be processed.

For someone who does a lot of videos, this could easily save hundreds of hours in a year.

Apple says its 64-bit architecture is a key to ensuring every bit of your computer's processing power is harnessed.

Final Cut Pro comes with an array of transitions and title templates to jazz up your video, as well as colour grading and audio editing features.

The audio effects were particularly impressive, transforming ordinary audio at a concert into something useable.

If you want to take things a step further, Motion 5, which retails for $49.99, provides advanced tools to let you customise titles, transitions and effects.

Compressor 4 allows you to customise the export settings built into Final Cut which include everything from YouTube uploads to HTTP live steaming.

If you are just doing basic movie editing on an Apple, iMovie may be enough.

But if you want to take your video editing to the next level and produce something that you can be really proud of, Final Cut Pro is well worth a look.

Topics:  apple, games and gadgets, imac


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Balloons soar for Monique three years after disappearance

THREE years after Monique Clubb went missing - Nikki Duncan, her daughter Ebony and Monique's brother Mickey at Torquay Jetty.

The fight to find Monique hasn’t ended

Man to face manslaughter charge over 97-year-old's death

A driver allegedly crashed into numerous cars at an intersection on Warwick Rd and drove off. He has now been charged with manslaughter.

Charges upgraded over Warwick Rd crash

BREAKING: Police say man not armed, still on the run

MAN HUNT: Police are patrolling the West Ipswich area looking for an armed man.

Police said the search began with a stolen car being found.

Latest deals and offers

Greyhound trainer brought possums to use as live bait

A FORMER leading greyhound trainer has escaped serving actual time behind bars for his role in sickening live baiting practices.

Balloons soar for Monique three years after disappearance

THREE years after Monique Clubb went missing - Nikki Duncan, her daughter Ebony and Monique's brother Mickey at Torquay Jetty.

The fight to find Monique hasn’t ended

Man to face manslaughter charge over 97-year-old's death

A driver allegedly crashed into numerous cars at an intersection on Warwick Rd and drove off. He has now been charged with manslaughter.

Charges upgraded over Warwick Rd crash

BREAKING: Police say man not armed, still on the run

MAN HUNT: Police are patrolling the West Ipswich area looking for an armed man.

Police said the search began with a stolen car being found.

Paedophile former priest targeted teens loses bail bid

The ex-priest indecently dealt with the teen in a shower

Road re-opens after horrific head-on crash at Plainland

Two cars have been involved in an accident at Plainland. Photo: Penny Dahl/Twitter

Police to re-open road after horrific two-vehicle crash at Plainland

Learn to empower business with guest speaker

Damian Morgan will exchange ideas with some of West Brisbane and Ipswich business leaders during a series of free seminars he will be holding at The Lions Richlands on Thursday June 16.

Damian Morgan to speak at business leaders seminar

Justice Lucy McCallum

Justice Lucy McCallum

Justice Lucy McCallum says she reduced Oliver Curtis's sentence due to comments...

Perisher has 50cm of snow

Resort to open after 50cm of snow.

Smiggin Holes and Blue Cow to open after 50cm of snaow falls in Perisher valley.

F1 pit stop in 1.92 seconds

Williams team make 1.92 second pit stop.

Williams Formula 1 team change all four tyres in equal fastest time ever.

Is this state’s cheapest house?

BARGAIN BUY: Is this North Bundaberg property the cheapest home in Queensland?

Becoming a real estate mogul is all about risk and reward

Rockhampton property in a lull, but a change is coming

Rockhampton's housing market in "pre-election mode"